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STEM and education
Reading, literature connections

General book list

Aardema, Verna. 1992. Bringing Rain to Kapiti Plain. New York: Puffin.
A cumulative rhyme relating how Ki-pat brought rain to the drought-stricken Kapiti Plain.

Arnosky, Jim. 2002. Watching Water Birds. Des Moines, Iowa: National Geographic Children’s Books.
This book contains full-color artwork showing water birds, their features and habitat, with fun facts and information to reinforce natural science learning.

Bailey, Donna. 1991. Wasting Water. London: Franklin Watts.
Bailey discusses how water is wasted and how it can be conserved and used more effectively.

Berkes, Marianne, and illustrator Jeanette Canyon. 2004. Over in the Ocean in a Coral Reef. Nevada City, Calif.: Dawn Publications.
Here’s a playful counting book that introduces children to creatures of the coral reef as they clap to the rhythm of “Over in the Meadow.”

Blair, Eric. 2004. The Crow and the Pitcher: A Retelling of Aesop’s Fable. Minneapolis, Minn.: Picture Window Books.
When a thirsty crow cannot drink from a pitcher because the water level is too low, she uses her ingenuity to solve the problem.

Borman, Susan, Robert Korth, Jo Temte, Carol Watkins. 1997. Through the Looking Glass. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.
This is a large-format field guide to aquatic plants in North America and is appealing to the general reader but detailed enough for the botanist and natural resource professional.

Bowden, Rob. 2003. Water Supply: Our Impact on the Planet. San Jose, Calif.: Raintree.
Bowden explains how a planet made up of more than 70 percent water can face a water shortage.

Cast, Vance C., and Sue Wilkinson. 1992. Where Does Water Come From? New York: Barron’s Educational Series.
This book shows how much water there is on Earth, how wells are dug to bring it out of the ground, and how water treatment plants work.

Chambers, Catherine. 2002. Drought. (A Wild Weather series book.) Portsmouth: Heinemann/Raintree.
Drought describes what causes droughts, the conditions that exist during a drought, the harmful and beneficial effects of dry periods, and their impact on humans, plants, and animals.

Cowley, Joy. 1997. Singing Down the Rain. New York: Harper Collins.
In the midst of a severe drought, a mysterious woman drives into town claiming she specializes in rain songs.

DeMott, Robert. 1990. Working Days: The Journals of The Grapes of Wrath. New York, Penguin Books.
While writing his greatest novel — The Grapes of Wrath — in 1938, Steinbeck kept a journal that chronicled his torments, self-doubts, late and false starts, reversals and other struggles to achieve his goal.

Douglas, Marjory Stoneman. 1990. Nine Florida Stories. Jacksonville: University of North Florida Press.
The nine stories in this first collection by Marjorie Stoneman Douglas take place in a scattering of South Florida settings — Miami, Fort Lauderdale, the Tamiami Trail, the Keys, the Everglades — and reveal the drama of hurricanes and plane crashes, of kidnappers, escaped convicts, and smugglers.

Dresen, M.D., and R.M.Korth. 1994. Life on the Edge…Owning Waterfront Property. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.
Practical and easily understood, this publication provides information to homeowners for protecting and enhancing lakes near their residences.

Ellis, Brian, and illustrator Michael S. Maydak. 2006. The Web at Dragonfly Pond. Nevada City, Calif.: Dawn Publications.
Each of nature’s creatures passes energy along in a unique way. All things on Earth, from the anchovy to the zooplankton, depend on the green plant, which is the hero of this story. The book has a wonderful teacher’s guide.

Fredericks, Anthony D., and illustrator Jennifer Dirubbio. 2005. Near One Cattail: Turtles, Logs and Leaping Frogs. Nevada City, Calif.: Dawn Publications.
Learn about what creatures live in soggy-boggy places — from dragonflies to frogs, a medley of creatures that swim, soar or crawl in a wetland home.

Galatis, Alex. 1995. Dudley’s Tea Party. Scholastic.
Dudley uses too much water in the morning and cannot find enough water to make tea for his party.

Green, Jen. 2005. Why Should I Save Water? New York: Barron’s Educational Series.
Children learn that water is one of our most precious natural resources. The text discusses ways families can avoid wasting water.

Grobler, Piet. 2002. Hey, Frog! Ashville, N.C.: Front Street/Lemniscaat.
On a very hot day, the animals are roaring mad when a frog drinks up all the water on the savannah, but each animal has an idea of how to get the water back.

Guthrie, Donna. 1993. Nobiah’s Well: A Modern African Folk Tale. Nashville, Tenn.: Ideals Children’s Books.
An African boy carrying home precious water for his family shares it with a succession of animals and eventually has his kindness repaid in an unexpected way.

Hemingway, Ernest. 1952. The Old Man and the Sea. New York: Scribner.
The Old Man and the Sea recounts an epic battle between an old, experienced fisherman and a giant marlin said to be the largest catch of his life. It is a novella (just over 100 pages in length) by Ernest Hemingway written in Cuba in 1951 and published in 1952. It was the last major work of fiction to be produced by Hemingway and published in his lifetime.

Keams, Geri. 1998. Small Girl Bring Water: A Navajo Story. Flagstaff, Ariz: Rising Moon.
This retelling of a traditional Navajo creation myth explains how water came to the Earth.

Kessler, Cristina. 2000. My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd. New York: Orchard Books.
Residents of a Sudanese village rejoice when a traditional water storage method is replaced by modern technology, but Fatima’s grandmother knows there is no substitute for the reliability of the baobab tree.

Nelson, Robin. 2003. We Use Water. Minneapolis, Minn.: Lerner Publications.
Uses simple text and pictures to give examples of the ways we use water.

Pratt, Kristen Joy. 1994. Swim Through the Sea. Nevada City, Calif.: Dawn Publications.
Children will take an alphabetical tour of ocean animals led by Seamore the seahorse. Each animal has a simplified alliterative description.

Rinehart, Susie Caldwell, and illustrator Anisa Claire Hovemann. 2004. Eliza and the Dragonfly. Nevada City, Calif.: Dawn Publications.
After a dragonfly lands on Eliza’s toothbrush, she visits a nearby pond with her bug-loving aunt. There she sees a dragonfly and is introduced to the fascinating characteristics and world of the dragonfly. Before long, Eliza changes her tune. The book includes information about the life cycle of dragonflies and a resource section.

Rodgers, Alan, and Angella Streluk. 2002. Precipitation. Chicago: Heinemann Educational Books.
This book for elementary children focuses on meteorology and climatology and gives them an in-depth view of weather forecasting.

Stanley, Jerry. 1993. Children of the Dust Bowl: The True Story of the School at Weedpatch Camp. New York: Crown Books.
Stanley describes the plight of the migrant workers who traveled from the Dust Bowl to California during the Depression and were forced to live in a federal labor camp; he also discusses the school that was built for migrant children.

Steinbeck, John. 1939. The Grapes of Wrath. New York: Viking Press.
The Grapes of Wrath is a classic novel published in 1939. This novel focuses on a poor family of sharecroppers, the Joads, driven from their home by drought, economic hardship, and changes in the agriculture industry.

Wheeler, Jill C. 1993. Every Drop Counts: A Book About Water. Rockbottom Books.
The author discusses water conservation and suggests ways to safeguard this precious resource.

Project WET literature resources

Adventures in Density

Willis, Shirley. 1999. Tell Me How Ships Float. London: Franklin Watts.
Uses simple experiments and activities to explore concepts such as density, upthrust, and water displacement and to explain why objects float or sink.

Parker, Janice. 1999. The Science of Water. Milwaukee, Wisc.: Gareth Stevens, Inc.
Presents information about the properties of water and its uses, including such topics as water’s various forms, the water cycle, and salt water versus freshwater.

Hemingway, Ernest. 1952. The Old Man and the Sea. New York: Scribner.

Roth, Arthur. 1974. The Iceburg Hermit. New York: Four Winds Press.

Twain, Mark. 1896. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. New York: Harper.

AfterMath

Stallone, Linda P. 1992. The Flood That Came to Grandma’s House. Fairfield, Iowa: Upshur Press.
When the rainfall from Hurricane Agnes causes the Susquehanna River to flood, Grandma and Grandpa abandon their home and flee to higher ground.

Kurtz, Jane. 2000. River Friendly, River Wild. New York: Simon and Schuster Children’s Publishing.
A family experiences a renewed appreciation for home and community after they are evacuated during a spring flood and then return to survey the damage.

Lyon, George Ella, and Stephen Gammell. 1993. Come A Tide. New York: Orchard Books.
A girl provides a lighthearted account of the spring floods at her rural home.

Burby, Liza. 1999. Tropical Storms and Hurricanes. New York: PowerKids Press.
This is an introduction to tropical storms and hurricanes, with information on how they begin, when and where they occur, the damage they can do, and some of the worst storms of the century.

Simon, Seymour. 1989. Storms. New York: Morrow Jr. Books.

A-maze-ing Water

Cole, Joanna. 1988. The Magic School Bus at the Waterworks. New York: Scholastic.
Ms. Frizzle, an unflappable science teacher, drives the magical school bus into a cloud where the children shrink to the size of water droplets and follow the course of water through the city’s waterworks system.

Donald, Rhonda Lucas. 2002. Water Pollution. Children’s Press.
Text and color photos present the causes and effects of water pollution, covering pesticides, airborne pollutants, wetland conservation, and other related topics.

Aqua Bodies

Kerley, Barbara. 2006. A Cool Drink of Water. Wash., D.C.: National Geographic Children’s Books.
The book depicts people around the world collecting, chilling, and drinking water.

Aqua Notes (music on CD)

Brennan, Billy B.—The Natural Song and Dance Man. 1998–2004. Romp in the Swamp. www.billybproductions.com.
Fourteen original songs are loaded with funny and interesting facts about swamp animals and their wetlands habitat. Alligators, ducks, snapping turtles, and muskrats co-star with cattails and other marsh grasses in the daily struggle for coexistence and survival in the swamp.

Brennan, Billy B.—The Natural Song and Dance Man. 1998–2004. The Ways of the Bay. www.billybproductions.com.
Billy B. takes you on a musical adventure, featuring all the songs from the video, “It’s Happening Today on the Chesapeake Bay,” plus four new melodies. Kids, parents, and teachers have quickly made this one of Billy B.’s most popular recordings.

Tickle Tune Typhoon. 2001–2007. Singing Science. Redway, Calif.: Music for Little People. www.musicforlittlepeople.com.
A CD of styles from rap to classical of children’s songs about various scientific subjects like astronomy, biology, chemistry, and ecology.

Back to the Future

Stallone, Linda P. 1992. The Flood That Came to Grandma’s House. Fairfield, Iowa: Upshur Press.
When the rainfall from Hurricane Agnes causes the Susquehanna River to flood, Grandma and Grandpa abandon their home and flee to higher ground.

Sipiera, Paul P., and Diane M. Floods. 1998. Children’s Press.
Floods explains the importance of water to life on Earth, how flooding occurs, and some of its most devastating consequences.

Branching Out

Holling, Holling Clancy. 1978. Minn of the Mississippi. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
This is about the adventures of a three-legged snapping turtle as she travels from the headwaters to the mouth of the Mississippi River to illustrate the life cycle of the turtle and the geography, history, geology, and climate of the river.

Locker, Thomas. 1998. Where the River Begins. New York: Puffin.
Two young boys and their grandfather go on a camping trip to find the source of the river that flows by their home.

Holling, Holling Clancy. 1941. Paddle-to-the-Sea. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
A young Indian boy carves an Indian figure in a small canoe and sends him off on a long, adventurous journey through the Great Lakes to the sea.

Capture, Store, and Release

Kalman, Bobbie, and Amanda Bishop. 2002. What Are Wetlands? New York: Crabtree Publishing Co.
The book investigates some types of wetlands, including swamps, salt marshes, bogs, and flood plains and the many plants and animals that live in wetlands; and the threats to these ecosystems.

CEO (The)

Goldburg, Jake. 1992. Economics and the Environment (Earth at Risk). New York: Chelsea House Publications.
Goldburg examines the role of economics in preserving or destroying the environment and conflicts between companies and environmentalists.

Choices and Preferences, Water Index

Nelson, Robin. 2003. We Use Water. Minneapolis, Minn.: Lerner Publications.
Using simple text and pictures, the book gives examples of ways that we use water.

Cold Cash in the Icebox

Royston, Angela. 2003. Conductors and Insulators (My World of Science). Portsmouth: Heinemann.
Royston explains science that you see in the world around you and use every day while students investigate conductors and insulators.

Color Me A Watershed

Atwell, Debby.1993. River. New York: Hougton Mifflin/Walter Lorraine Books.
River relates the changes that occur through the centuries along a riverbank, from the arrival of the first humans to the coming of the first settlers, from the industrial revolution to the present day.

Lynne, Cherry. 2002. A River Ran Wild. San Diego, Calif.: Voyager Books.
This book is an environmental history of the Nashua River, from its discovery by Indians through the polluting years of the Industrial Revolution to the ambitious cleanup that revitalized it.

Donald, Rhonda Lucas. 2002. Water Pollution. Children’s Press.
Text and color photos present the causes and effects of water pollution, covering pesticides, airborne pollutants, wetland conservation, and other related topics.

Stille, Darlene R. 1990. Soil Erosion and Pollution. Children’s Press.
Stille discusses the erosion and pollution of soil, the harmful effects of these processes, and ways of preventing them.

Common Water

Lynne, Cherry. 2002. A River Ran Wild. San Diego, Calif.: Voyager Books.
This book is an environmental history of the Nashua River, from its discovery by Indians through the polluting years of the Industrial Revolution to the ambitious cleanup that revitalized it.

Atwell, Debby. 1993. River. New York: Hougton Mifflin/Walter Lorraine Books.
River relates the changes that occur through the centuries along a riverbank, from the arrival of he first humans to the coming of the first settlers, from the industrial revolution to the present day.

Dilemma Derby

McDonald, Adrian, and David Kay. 1999. Water Resources: Issues and Strategies (Themes in Resource Management). Harlow/Essex: Longman Publishing Group.
This publication provides examples about the quality, management, and threats to water.

Hanmer, Trudy J. 1985. Water Resources. London: Franklin Watts.
Water Resources describes the nature of water, its sources and cycles, and the problems of pollution and the dwindling water supply.

Drop in the Bucket (A)

Bowden, Rob. 2003. Water Supply: Our Impact on the Planet. San Jose, Calif.: Raintree.
Bowden explains how a planet made up of more than 70 percent water can face a water shortage.

Cast, Vance C., and Sue Wilkinson. 1992. Where Does Water Come From? New York: Barron’s Educational Series.
This book shows how much water there is on Earth, how wells are dug to bring it out of the ground, and how water treatment plants work.

Dust Bowls and Failed Levees

Aardema, Verna. 1992. Bringing Rain to Kapiti Plain. New York: Puffin.
This is a cumulative rhyme relating how Ki-pat brought rain to the drought-stricken Kapiti Plain.

Stanley, Jerry. 1993. Children of the Dust Bowl: The True Story of the School at Weedpatch Camp. New York: Crown Books.
Stanley describes the plight of the migrant workers who traveled from the Dust Bowl to California during the Depression and were forced to live in a federal labor camp and discusses the school that was built for their children.

Chambers, Catherine. 2002. Drought. (A Wild Weather series book.) Portsmouth: Heinemann/Raintree.
Drought describes what causes droughts, the conditions that exist during a drought, the harmful and beneficial effects of dry periods, and their impact on humans, plants, and animals.

Lyon, George Ella, and Stephen Gammell. 1993. Come A Tide. New York: Orchard Books.
A girl provides a lighthearted account of the spring floods at her rural home.

DeMott, Robert. 1990. Working Days: The Journals of The Grapes of Wrath. New York, Penguin Books.

Douglas, Marjory Stoneman. 1990. Nine Florida Stories. Jacksonville, Fla.: Univ. of North Florida Press.

Hemingway, Ernest. 1952. The Old Man and the Sea. New York: Scribner.

Lee, Jeanne M. 1985. Toad is the Uncle of Heaven: A Vietnamese Folk Tale. New York: Holt, Reinhart, and Winston.

Porter, Katherine Anne. 1962. Ship of Fools. Boston: Little Brown.

Steinbeck, John. 1939. The Grapes of Wrath. New York: Viking Press.

Easy Street

Bial, Raymond. 2001. The Mills (Building America). New York: Benchmark Books.
The Mills provides an account of how technology helped shape and define the American landscape from colonial through frontier times. Under discussion are forts, mills, canals, farms and houses- their forms, purpose and significance in United States history.

Cramer, Marian. (No date of publication.) Lantern Glow.
A compilation of the author’s articles published in the East River Guardian. Bryant, S.D.: Privately printed.

Wilder, Laura Ingalls. 1953. Little House on the Prairie. New York: Harper.

Energetic Water

Graham, Ian. 2001. Water Power. London: Hodder Wayland.
Graham examines the historical uses of water as a source of energy, the advantages and disadvantages, and new advances in harnessing water’s power.

Bial, Raymond. 2001. The Mills (Building America). New York: Benchmark Books.
The Mills provides an account of how technology helped shape and define the American landscape from colonial through frontier times. Under discussion are forts, mills, canals, farms and houses- their forms, purpose and significance in United States history.

Every Drop Counts

Bailey, Donna. 1991. Wasting Water. London: Franklin Watts.
Bailey discusses how water is wasted and how it can be conserved and used more effectively.

Green, Jen. 2005. Why Should I Save Water? New York: Barron’s Educational Series.
Children learn that water is one of our most precious natural resources. Discusses ways families can avoid wasting water.

Get the Groundwater Picture

Hoff, Mary King, and Mary M. Rodgers. 1991. Our Endangered Planet: Rivers and Lakes. Minneapolis, Minn.: Lerner Publications.
The authors describe the global uses and abuses of groundwater and suggest ways to preserve this valuable resource.

Cast, Vance C., and Sue Wilkinson. 1992. Where Does Water Come From? New York: Barron’s Educational Series.
This publication shows how much water there is on Earth, how wells are dug to bring it out of the ground, and how water treatment plants work.

Geyser Guts

Klingel, Cynthia Fitterer. 2000. Yellowstone National Park. Chanhassen, Minn.: Children’s World.
Klingel describes Yellowstone National Park, its location, its landscape, and its scenic wonders, including the Old Faithful geyser.

Bryan, T. Scott. 2005. Geysers: What They Are and How They Work. (Missoula, Mont.: Mountain Press Publishing Co.
This is a primer of basic knowledge needed to understand geysers of any size or sort anywhere.

Brimner, Larry Dane. 2000. Geysers (True Books). Children’s Press.
Geysers describes what geysers are, how they are formed, how they differ from other hot springs, why they erupt, and how they are affected by human interference.

Grave Mistake (A)

Hoff, Mary King, and Mary M. Rodgers. 1991. Our Endangered Planet: Rivers and Lakes. Minneapolis, Minn.: Lerner Publications.
The authors describe the global uses and abuses of groundwater and suggest ways to preserve this valuable resource.

Great Stony Brook (The)

Squire, Ann. 2002. Fossils. New York: Children’s Press.
This is an introduction to fossils, discussing the different types, where they are found, and how they are made.

Spickert, Diane Nelson. 2000. Earthsteps: A Rock’s Journey Through Time. (Golden, Colo.: Fulcrum Kids.
Spickert describes the geological setting for the transformation of a rock to a grain of sand over the course of millions of years.

Hooper, Meredith. 1996. The Pebble in My Pocket: A History of Our Earth. New York: Viking Press.
Follow the history of a pebble from its time in a volcano to the primordial forests; from there it is stepped on by dinosaurs, dragged by glaciers and picked up by cave people.

Aliki. 1972. Fossils Tell of Long Ago. New York: Crowell.
Aliki explains how fossils are formed and what they tell us about the past.

Great Water Journeys

Steger, Will, and Jon Bowermaster. 1997. Over the Top of the World. New York: Scholastic Press.
Follow the story of a modern day journey across the arctic.

Swan, Robert. 1988. Destination: Antarctica. New York: Scholastic.
See the photographic essay of modern journey from Cambridge to the South Pole.

Armstrong, Jennifer. 1998. Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World. New York: Crown.
Shipwreck is the true story of Shackleton and his crew when they were stranded for over a year near the South Pole and still survived.

Eubank, Patti Reeder. 2002. Seaman’s Journal: On the Trail with Lewis and Clark. Nashville, Tenn.: Ideals Children’s Books.
Seaman, the Newfoundland dog belonging to Meriwether Lewis, keeps an account of their adventures during the journey to the Pacific.

Fritz, Jean. 1994. Around the World in 100 Years. New York: Putnam’s.

Holling, Holling Clancy. 1941. Paddle-to-the-Sea. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
A young Indian boy carves an Indian figure in a small canoe and sends him off on a long, adventurous journey through the Great Lakes to the sea.

Mason, Anthony. 1993. Children’s Atlas of Exploration. Brookfield, Conn.: The Millbrook Press.

H2Olympics

Goodstein, Madeline P. 2004. Water Science Fair Projects: Using Ice Cubes, Super Soakers and Other Wet Stuff. Berkeley Heights, N.J.: Enslow Publishers.
Content includes: the structure of water, the three states of matter of water, surface tension, adhesion, and cohesion of liquid water and chemical properties of water.

Tocci, Salvatore. 2003. Experiments With Soap. New York: Children’s Press.
Projects and experiments use soap to explain such topics as surface tension and air currents, as well as why soap gets things clean.

Fiarotta, Noel. 1997. Great Experiments With H2O. New York: Sterling.
Presents basic facts about water and includes simple experiments to illustrate such aspects as surface tension, dispersion, saturation, and buoyancy.

Martin, Patricia A. Fink. 1997. Animals That Walk on Water. New York: Franklin Watts.
Describes how such creatures as the basilisk, Western grebe, and water strider manage to travel across the water’s surface.

Wick, Walter. 1997. A Drop of Water: A Book of Science and Wonder. New York: Scholastic Inc.
Amazing photographs in the book illustrate water properties.

Hangin’ Together

Watson, Philip. 1982. Liquid Magic. New York: Lothrop, Lee and Shepard Books.
Experiments illustrate the characteristics of liquids and their reactions in mixtures.

Neye, Emily. 2002. Water. New York: Grosset and Dunlap.
This book describes the sources, uses, and properties of water.

Hot Water

Goldburg, Jake. 1992. Economics and the Environment (Earth at Risk). New York: Chelsea House Publications.
This book examines the role of economics in preserving or destroying the environment and conflicts between companies and environmentalists.

Frost, Helen. 2000. Keeping Water Clean. Mankato, Minn.: Pebble Books.
Simple text and photographs describe water pollution, how it spreads, and its effects.

House of Seasons (A)

Peters, Lisa Westburg. 1990. Good Morning, River! New York: Arcade Pub.
Katherine and her friend, an older man named Carl, celebrate the seasons on their river together, until his absence requires her to grow and change as their special relationship changes.

Waldman, Neil. 2003. The Snowflake: A Water Cycle Story. Minneapolis, Minn.: The Millbrook Press.
Waldman traces the journey of a single drop of water throughout the year, with each month receiving its own spread.

Briggs, Raymond. 1995. The Snowman. New York: Random House.
When his snowman comes to life, a little boy invites him home and in return is taken on a flight high above the countryside.

Cash, Megan Montague. 2003. What Makes the Seasons? New York: Viking Press.
Easy rhyming text describes how plants grow and respond to seasonal changes.

Godwin, Sam. 2005. The Drop Goes Plop: A First Look at the Water Cycle. Minneapolis, Minn.: Picture Window Books.
Enjoy the changing seasons through a year in the city as Mama and baby seagull follow the journey of a drop of water.

Asimov, Isaac. 1991. Why Do We Have Different Seasons? Milwaukee, Minn.: G. Stevens Children’s Books.
The author describes how the seasons affect people and other living things.

Humpty, Dumpty

Donald, Rhonda Lucas. 2002. Water Pollution. New York: Children’s Press.
Text and color photos present the causes and effects of water pollution, covering pesticides, airborne pollutants, wetland conservation, and other related topics.

Keller, Holly. 1994. Grandfather’s Dream. New York: Greenwillow Books.
After the end of the war in Vietnam, a young boy’s grandfather dreams of restoring the wetlands of the Mekong delta, hoping that the large cranes that once lived there will return.

Imagine!

Schaefer, Lola M., and Wattenburg, Jane. 2001. This is the Rain. New York: Greenwillow Books.
Cumulative text describes how water falls from the clouds as rain and eventually makes it way to the sea and back to the clouds.

Hamilton, Kersten. 2001. This is the Ocean. Honesdale, Penn.: Caroline House/Boyds Mills Press.
Explores the process of precipitation from raindrop to ocean.

Brimner, Larry Dane. 1999. Raindrops. New York: Children’s Press.
Follows the water cycle, as a raindrop moves into a creek, into a stream, into a river, and to its end in a lazy ocean.

Incredible Journey (The)

McKinney, Barbara Shaw. 1998. A Drop Around the World. Nevada City, Calif.: Dawn Publications.
This work delights readers with a clever poetic presentation on the water cycle.

Godwin, Sam. 2005. The Drop Goes Plop: A First Look at the Water Cycle. Minneapolis, Minn.: Picture Window Books.
Enjoy the changing seasons through a year in the city as Mama and baby seagull follow the journey of a drop of water.

Waldman, Neil. 2003. The Snowflake: A Water Cycle Story. Minneapolis, Minn.: The Millbrook Press.
Readers follow the journey of a water droplet through the various stages of the water cycle, from precipitation to evaporation and condensation.

Hooper, Meredith. 1998. A Drop in My Drink: A Story of Water on Our Planet. New York: Viking Press.
Here, readers follow the voyage of a drop of water through the millennia since the formation of our watery planet.

Irrigation Interpretation

Lafarge, Oliver. 1954. Mother Ditch. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. Spanish edition, 1983, Sante Fe, N.M.: Sunstone Press.
Describes the summer the mother ditch went dry, a time of crisis for the Romero family, and how to grow fruits and vegetables by irrigation in the dry Cerrito region of New Mexico.

Is There Water on Zork?

Mebane, Robert C. 1995. Water and Other Liquids. New York: Twenty-first Century Books.
Includes experiments on water and liquids.

Just Passing Through

Prager, Ellen J. 2000. Sand. Wash., D.C.: National Geographic Society.
Describes the formation of sand from materials such as coral, rock, or crystals and shows how it can be moved through water, wind, ice, and other erosion agents.

Barrow, Lloyd H. 1991. Adventures With Rocks and Minerals: Geology Experiments for Young People. Hillside, N.J.: Enslow Publishing.
Uses earth science experiments for home or school to demonstrate the properties of rocks and minerals and how they relate to important environmental concerns, such as earthquakes, erosion, acid rain, and water pollution.

Stille, Darlene R. 1990. Soil Erosion and Pollution. Chicago: Children’s Press.
Discusses the erosion and pollution of soil, the harmful effects of these processes, and ways of preventing them.

Life Box (The)

Aardema, Verna. 1992. Bringing Rain to Kapiti Plain. New York: Puffin.
A cumulative rhyme relating how Ki-pat brought rain to the drought-stricken Kapiti Plain.

Blair, Eric. 2004. The Crow and the Pitcher: A Retelling of Aesop’s Fable. Minneapolis, Minn.: Picture Window Books.
When a thirsty crow cannot drink from a pitcher because the water level is too low, she uses her ingenuity to solve the problem.

Holub, Joan. 2001. The Garden That We Grew. New York: Viking Press.
Children plant pumpkin seeds, water and weed the garden patch, watch the pumpkins grow, pick them, and enjoy them in various ways.

Glaser, Omri. 1999. Round the Garden. New York: Henry N. Abrams.
Traces the journey of a tear as it falls to the ground, evaporates, reappears as rain, and waters a garden to make an onion grow to produce more tears.

Life in the Fast Lane

Stille, Darlene. 1999. Wetlands. New York: Children’s Press.
Examines the different types of wetlands and the plant and animal life they support.

Long Haul (The)

Nelson, Robin. 2003. We Use Water. Minneapolis, Minn.: Lerner Publications.
Using simple text and pictures, gives examples of ways that we use water.

Macroinvertebrate Mayhem

Halfmann, Janet. 2001. Life in a Pond. Mankato, Minn.: Creative Education.
Briefly describes some of the creatures that live in a pond, including water striders, tadpoles, and dragonfly nymphs.

Pohl, Kathleen. 1987. Giant Water Bugs. Milwaukee, Wis.: Raintree Publishing.
Describes in text and photographs the physical characteristics, life cycles, and behavior of giant water bugs.

Molecules in Motion

Stille, Darlene R. 2005. Solids, Liquids and Gases. Chanhassen, Minn.: Child’s World.
Content includes, discovering states of matter, exploring solids, liquids, and gases, changing from solid to liquid to gas and using solids, liquids and gases.

Hewitt, Sally. 1998. Solid, Liquid, or Gas? New York: Children’s Press.
Presents information about the properties of solids, liquids, and gases, using observation and activities.

Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weidner. 1998. What is the World Made Of? All About Solids, Liquids and Gases. New York: HarperCollins Publishers.
In simple text, presents the three states of matter, solid, liquid, and gas, and describes their attributes.

Rosinsky, Natalie. 2003. M. Water: Up, Down, and All Around. Minneapolis, Minn.: Picture Window Books.
Describes the water cycle and the importance of water, explaining evaporation and condensation, dew and frost, and the three states of water.

Pipe, Jim. 2002. Why Does Ice Melt? Brookfield, Conn.: Copper Beech Books.
Explains the concepts of freezing and melting, using very simple terms and projects.

Money Down the Drain

Pringle, Laurence. 1992. Water: The Next Great Resource Battle. New York: Macmillan.
Explores the social, political, and economic aspects of a vital resource—water.

Nature Rules!

Stallone, Linda P. 1992. The Flood That Came to Grandma’s House. Fairfield, Iowa: Upshur Press.
When the rainfall from Hurricane Agnes causes the Susquehanna River to flood, Grandma and Grandpa abandon their home and flee to higher ground.

Lyon, George Ella, and Stephen Gammell. 1993. Come A Tide. New York: Orchard Books.
A girl provides a lighthearted account of the spring floods at her rural home.

Cole, Joanna. 1995. The Magic School Bus Inside a Hurricane. New York: Scholastic.
When Ms. Frizzle’s class takes a field trip to the local weather station, they end up in a hurricane.

Burby, Liza. 1999. Tropical Storms and Hurricanes. New York: PowerKids Press.
An introduction to tropical storms and hurricanes with information on how they begin, when and where they occur, the damage they can do, and some of the worst storms of the century.

No Bellyachers

Berger, Melvin. 1996. Germs Make Me Sick! New York: HarperCollins.
Explains how bacteria and viruses affect the human body and how the body fights them.

LeMaster, Leslie Jean. 1985. Bacteria and Viruses. Chicago: Children’s Press.
Discusses bacteria, viruses, diseases and immunity.

Pass the Jug

Grobler, Piet. 2002. Hey, Frog! Ashville, N.C.: Front Street/Lemniscaat.
On a very hot day, the animals are roaring mad when a frog drinks up all the water on the savannah, but each animal has an idea of how to get the water back.

People of the Bog

Himmelman, John. 2004. Frog in a Bog. Watertown, Mass.: Charlesbridge.
Introduces the bog ecosystem by chronicling a complex chain of events set off by the simple jump of a frog into some moss.

Wilson, Karma. 2003. Frog in the Bog. New York: Margaret K. McElderry Books.
A frog in the bog grows larger and larger as he eats more and more bugs, until he attracts the attention of an alligator that puts an end to his eating.

Perspectives

Gardner, Robert. 1982. Water: The Life-Sustaining Resource. New York: J. Messner.
Discusses water resource management issues.

McDonald, Adrian, and David Kay. 1999. Water Resources: Issues and Strategies (Themes in Resource Management). Harlow/Essex: Longman Publishing Group.
Provides examples about the quality, management, and threats to water.

Hanmer, Trudy J. 1985. Water Resources. New York: F. Watts.
Describes the nature of water, its sources and cycles, and the problems of pollution and the dwindling water supply.

Piece It Together

Taylor, Barbara. 2001. Weather and Climate: Geography Facts and Experiments. New York: Kingfisher Publications.
An introduction to weather and climate, discussing world climates, seasons, violent weather, weather pollution, and the elements of changing weather. Includes instructions for making a weather station.

Poetic Precipitation

Martin, Jacqueline Briggs. 1998. Snowflake Bentley. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
Story of Wilson Bentley, the first person to photograph snowflakes.

Locker, Thomas. 2000. Cloud Dance. San Diego, Calif.: Silverwhistle/Harcourt, 2000.
A book of paintings and poems, this one dedicated to clouds.

Singer, Marilyn. 2003. How to Cross a Pond: Poems About Water. New York: A. A. Knopf.
This work contains 19 poems that celebrate water’s many facets.

Levy, Constance. 2002. Splash! Poems of Our Watery World. New York: Orchard Books.
More than 30 poems celebrate water in its myriad forms, from the ocean to a droplet of dew.

Poison Pump

Berger, Melvin. 1996. Germs Make Me Sick! New York: HarperCollins.
Explains how bacteria and viruses affect the human body and how the body fights them.

LeMaster, Leslie Jean. 1985. Bacteria and Viruses. Chicago: Children’s Press.
Discusses bacteria, viruses, diseases and immunity.

Taylor, Mildred D. 1995. The Well: David’s Story. New York: Dial Books for Young Readers.
In Mississippi in the early 1900s, 10-year-old David Logan’s family generously shares their well water with both white and black neighbors in an atmosphere of potential racial violence.

Price is Right (The)

Cole, Joanna. 1988. The Magic School Bus at the Waterworks. New York: Scholastic.
Ms. Frizzle, an unflappable science teacher, drives the magical school bus into a cloud where the children shrink to the size of water droplets and follow the course of water through the city’s waterworks system.

Pucker Effect (The)

Hoff, Mary King, and Mary M. Rodgers. 1991. Our Endangered Planet: Rivers and Lakes. Minneapolis, Minn.: Lerner Publications.
Describe the global uses and abuses of groundwater and suggest ways to preserve this valuable resource.

Raining Cats and Dogs

Bryan, Ashley. 1999. The Night Has Ears: African Proverbs. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers.
A collection of 26 proverbs, some serious and some humorous, from a variety of African tribes.

Guthrie, Donna. 1993. Nobiah’s Well: A Modern African Folk Tale. Nashville, Tenn.: Ideals Children’s Books.
An African boy carrying home precious water for his family shares it with a succession of animals and eventually has his kindness repaid in an unexpected way.

Rainstick (The)

Yolen, Jane. 1995. Water Music. Honesdale, Penn.: Wordsong/Boyds Mills Press.
Water has many sounds in nature. Yolen describes these sounds in poetic fashion.

Robinson, Sandra Chisholm. 1994. The Rainstick: A Fable. Helena, Mont.: Falcon Press.
A boy embarks on a quest to bring back the sound of rain to his West African village. Includes a discussion of how rainsticks are used today and instructions for making a rainstick.

Wundrow, Deanna. 1999. Jungle Drum. Brookfield, Conn.: The Millbrook Press.
The rain forest is filled with the sounds of the echoing jungle drum, dripping water, and the many animals talking.

Rainy-Day Hike

Locker, Thomas. 1998. Where the River Begins. New York: Puffin.
Two young boys and their grandfather go on a camping trip to find the source of the river that flows by their home.

Holling, Holling Clany. 1941. Paddle-to-the-Sea. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
A young Indian boy carves an Indian figure in a small canoe and sends him off on a long, adventurous journey through the Great Lakes to the sea.

Reaching Your Limits

Cole, Joanna. 1988. The Magic School Bus at the Waterworks. New York: Scholastic.
Ms. Frizzle, an unflappable science teacher, drives the magical school bus into a cloud where the children shrink to the size of water droplets and follow the course of water through the city’s waterworks system.

Schwartz, David. 1993. How Much Is a Million? New York: Mulberry Books.
Text and pictures try to make possible the conceptualization of a million, a billion, and a trillion.

Salt Marsh Players

Kalman, Bobbie, and Amanda Bishop. 2003. What Are Wetlands? New York: Crabtree Publishing.
Investigates some types of wetlands, including swamps, salt marshes, bogs, and flood plains; the many plants and animals that live in wetlands; and the threats to these ecosystems.

Arnosky, Jim. 2004. Following the Coast. New York: HarperCollins.
On their travels up the East Coast, the author and his wife describe the wildlife they encounter in different salt marshes.

Sparkling Water

Cole, Joanna. 1988. The Magic School Bus at the Waterworks. New York: Scholastic.
Ms. Frizzle, an unflappable science teacher, drives the magical school bus into a cloud where the children shrink to the size of water droplets and follow the course of water through the city’s waterworks system.

Stream Scene

Aliki. 1989. My Five Senses. New York: Crowell.
Relates the excitement a child feels when discovering the world through the use of the five senses.

Cole, Joanna. 1999. The Magic School Bus Explores the Senses. New York: Scholastic.
Relates the excitement a child feels when discovering the world through the use of the five senses.

Showers, Paul and Aliki. 1991. The Listening Walk. New York: HarperCollins.
We’re going on a listening walk. Shhh. Do not talk. Get ready to fill your ears with the world of wonderful and surprising sounds.

Sum of the Parts

Atwell, Debby. 1993. River. New York: Hougton Mifflin/Walter Lorraine Books.
Relates the changes that occur through the centuries along a riverbank, from the arrival of the first humans to the coming of the first settlers, from the industrial revolution to the present day.

Donald, Rhonda Lucas. 2002. Water Pollution. Children’s Press.
Text and color photos present the causes and effects of water pollution, covering such topics as pesticides, airborne pollutants, wetland conservation, and other related topics.

Frost, Helen. 2000. Keeping Water Clean. Mankato, Minn.: Pebble Books.
Text and color photos present the causes and effects of water pollution, covering pesticides, airborne pollutants, wetland conservation, and other related topics.

Hoff, Mary King, and Mary M. Rodgers. 1991. Our Endangered Planet: Rivers and Lakes. Minneapolis, Minn.: Lerner Publications.
Alerts the reader to the dangers of surface water pollution and the global imperative to keep these waters fresh.

Santore, Charles. 1997. William the Curious: Knight of the Water Lillies. New York: Random House.
A lowly frog teaches a beautiful queen about the dangers of pollution.

Super Bowl Surge

Duvall, Jill. 1997. Who Keeps the Water Clean? Ms. Schindler! New York: Children’s Press.
Describes the activities of a sewage disposal plant worker who makes sure that the machines are functioning properly to keep the neighborhood’s water clean and safe.

Coombs, Karen Mueller. 1995. Flush! Treating Wastewater. Minneapolis, Minn.: Carolrhonda Books.
A thorough and lively explanation of how wastewater is treated in the United States.

Super Sleuths

Berger, Melvin. 1996. Germs Make Me Sick! New York: HarperCollins.
Explains how bacteria and viruses affect the human body and how the body fights them.

LeMaster, Leslie Jean. 1985. Bacteria and Viruses. Chicago: Children’s Press.
Discusses bacteria, viruses, diseases and immunity.

Thirsty Plants

Hidalgo, Maria. 2003. Water. Mankato, Minn.: Creative Education.
Presents information on the properties of water, the hydrologic cycle, oceans, rain and snow, and the importance of water to living things.

Trueit, Trudi Strain. 2002. The Water Cycle. New York: F. Watts.
Explains complex concepts such as erosion, the water cycle, and evaporation.

Thunderstorm (The)

Polacco, Patricia. 1990. Thunder Cake. New York: Philomel Books.
Grandma finds a way to dispel her grandchild’s fear of thunderstorms.

Martin, Bill, and John Archanambault. 1988. Listen to the Rain. New York: H. Holt.
Listen to the rain, the whisper of the rain, the slow soft sprinkle, the drip-drop tinkle, the first wet whisper of the rain.

Stolz, Mary. 1988. Storm in the Night. New York: Harper and Rowe.
While sitting through a fearsome thunderstorm that has put the lights out, Thomas hears a story from Grandfather’s boyhood, when Grandfather was afraid of thunderstorms.

Lesser, Carolyn. 1997. Storm on the Desert. San Diego, Calif.: Harcourt Brace.
Describes the animal and plant life in a desert in the American Southwest and the effects of a short but violent thunderstorm.

Water: Read All About It!

Any water-related books, newspaper articles or any other water-related articles can be used with this activity.

Water Action

Allsburg, Chris Van. 1990. Just a Dream. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
Young Walter litters and refuses to sort trash for recycling, until he dreams of an overcrowded and polluted future which terrifies him into taking care of the earth.

Bang, Molly. 2000. Nobody Particular: One Woman’s Fight to Save the Bays. New York: Holt.
Describes a female shrimper’s attempt to stop a large chemical company from polluting a bay in East Texas.

Lewis, Barbara A. 1995. The Kid’s Guide to Service Projects: Over 500 Service Ideas for Young People Who Want to make a Difference. Minneapolis, Minn.: Free Spirit.
Describes a variety of opportunities for youngsters to participate in successful community service.

Water Address

McDonald, Megan. 2003. Penguin and Little Blue. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers.
Penguin and his pint-sized partner Little Blue escape their promotional tour for Water World and return to Antarctica to huddle with their penguin buddies.

Marble, Gracie. 1992. A Picture Book of Water Birds. Mahwah, N.J.: Troll Associates, 1992.
Briefly introduces 18 water birds, such as grebe, cormorant, puffin, wandering albatross, and loon.

Donovan, Sandra. 2002. Animals of Rivers, Lakes and Ponds. Austin, Tex.: Raintree Steck-Vaughn.
Describes the physical characteristics, behavior, adaptations, and life cycle of four animals that live in rivers, lakes, and ponds: the great blue heron, giant water bug, raccoon, and snapping turtle.

Cooper, Ann. 1998. Around the Pond. Boulder, Colo.: Reinhart Publishers.
Examines the interdependent lives of the various animals and plants that inhabit various parts of a pond from the surface film of the water to its weedy depths.

Johnson, Sylvia A. 1989. Water Insects. Minneapolis, Minn.: Lerner Publications.
Describes the physical characteristics, behavior, and life cycles of some insects that spend most of their lives in the water.

Water Celebration

Partridge, Elizabeth. 2003. Kogi’s Mysterious Journey. New York: Dutton Children’s Books.
In this Japanese folktale, Kogi paints the shore of Lake Biwa, but is unable to capture the vigor and beauty that inspire him. One day, Kogi wades into the water to release a fish, and unable to resist follows in its wake, eventually becoming a fish himself, and learning what it is to be a fish in the lake.

Keams, Geri. 1998. Small Girl Bring Water: A Navajo Story. Flagstaff, Ariz: Rising Moon.
A retelling of a traditional Navajo creation myth that explains how water came to Earth.

Cowley, Joy. 1997. Singing Down the Rain. New York: HarperCollins.
In the midst of a severe drought, a mysterious woman drives into town claiming she specializes in rainsongs.

Guthrie, Donna. 1993. Nobiah’s Well: A Modern African Folk Tale. Nashville, Tenn.: Ideals Children’s Books.
An African boy carrying home precious water for his family shares it with a succession of animals and eventually has his kindness repaid in an unexpected way.

Crespo, George. 1993. How the Sea Began: A Taino Myth. New York: Clarion Books.
The gourd containing the bow and arrow of the great, departed hunter Yayael produces a torrent of water that becomes the world’s ocean.

Rhee, Nami. 2003. Magic Spring: A Korean Folktale. New York: Putnam.
An old man and his wife discover a fountain of youth and benefit from its magic, but the water has a different effect on their greedy neighbor.

Water Concentration

Nelson, Robin. 2003. We Use Water. Minneapolis, Minn.: Lerner Publications.
Using simple text and pictures, gives examples of ways that we use water.

Kessler, Cristina. 2000. My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd. New York: Orchard Books.
Residents of a Sudanese village rejoice when a traditional water storage method is replaced by modern technology, but Fatima’s grandmother knows there is no substitute for the reliability of the baobab tree.

Water Crossings

Nirgiotis, Nicholas. 1995. West by Waterway: Rivers and U.S. Expansion. New York: F. Watts.
Topics include inland water transportation, frontier and pioneer life, and rivers and waterways in the United States.

wAteR in moTion

Locker, Thomas. 2000. Cloud Dance. San Diego, Calif.: Silverwhistle/Harcourt.
A book of paintings and poems, this one dedicated to clouds.

Locker, Thomas. 2002. Water Dance. San Diego, Calif.: Voyager Books/Harcourt.
A poetic verse accompanied by Locker’s paintings of the water cycle.

Fowler, Allan. 1999. The Wonder of a Waterfall. New York: Children’s Press.
Simply describes waterfalls and describes such notable examples as Niagara Falls and Angel Falls.

Water Log

Dewey, Jennifer Owings. 2001. Antarctic Journal: Four Months at the Bottom of the World. China: HarperCollins Children’s Books.
Letters and journal entries from a visit to Antartica, the windiest, coldest, most forbidding region on Earth.

Webb, Sophie. 2000. My Season With Penguins: An Antarctic Journal. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
Describes the author’s two-month stay in Antarctica to study and draw penguins.

Pratt-Serafini, Kristin Joy. 2002. Saguaro Moon: A Desert Journal. Nevada City, Calif.: Dawn Publications.
When her family moves to the Sonoran Desert in Arizona, Megan keeps a nature journal in which she describes the desert, the changes that occur throughout the seasons, and how these affect the plant and animal inhabitants.

Eubank, Patti Reeder. 2002. Seaman’s Journal: On the Trail with Lewis and Clark. Nashville, Tenn.: Ideals Children’s Books.
Seaman, the Newfoundland dog belonging to Meriwether Lewis, keeps an account of their adventures during the journey to the Pacific.

Water Match

Stille, Darlene R. 2005. Solids, Liquids and Gases. Chanhassen, Minn.: Child’s World.
Content includes, discovering states of matter, exploring solids, liquids, and gases, changing from solid to liquid to gas and using solids, liquids and gases.

Hewitt, Sally. 1998. Solid, Liquid, or Gas? New York: Children’s Press.
Presents information about the properties of solids, liquids, and gases, using observation and activities.

Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weidner. 1998. What is the World Made Of? All About Solids, Liquids and Gases. New York: HarperCollins.
In simple text, presents the three states of matter, solid, liquid, and gas, and describes their attributes.

Locker, Thomas. 2002. Water Dance. San Diego, Calif.: Voyager Books/Harcourt.
A poetic verse accompanied by Locker’s paintings of the water cycle.

Locker, Thomas. 2000. Cloud Dance. San Diego, Calif.: Silverwhistle/Harcourt.
A second book of paintings and poems, this one dedicated to clouds.

Peters, Lisa Westberg. 1991. Water’s Way. New York: Arcade.
Introduces the different forms that water can have, from clouds to steam to fog.

Water Message in Stone

Lauber, Patricia. 1998. Painters of the Caves. Wash., D.C., National Geographic Society.
Photographs and information on pictographs, hieroglyphics, and the people who created them.

Water Meter

Nelson, Robin. 2003. We Use Water. Minneapolis, Minn.: Lerner Publications.
Using simple text and pictures, gives examples of ways that we use water.

Water Models

George, Jean Craighead. 1983. One Day in the Desert. New York: Crowell.
Explains how the animal and human inhabitants of the Sonoran Desert of Arizona, including a mountain lion, a roadrunner, a coyote, a tortoise, and members of the Papago Indian tribe, adapt to and survive the desert’s merciless heat.

George, Jean Craighead. 1990. One Day in the Tropical Rainforest. New York: Crowell.
The future of the Rain Forest of the Macaw depends on a scientist and a young Indian boy as they search for a nameless butterfly during one day in the rain forest.

George, Jean Craighead. 1984. One Day in the Alpine Tundra. New York: Crowell.
Relates a boy’s adventure when he is alone on the alpine tundra on a stormy day.

Water Write

Singer, Marilyn. 2003. How to Cross a Pond: Poems About Water. New York: A. A. Knopf.
Nineteen poems celebrate water’s many facets.

Yolen, Jane. 1995. Water Music. Honesdale, Penn.: Wordsong/Boyds Mills Press.
Water poetry for children.

Levy, Constance. 2002. Splash! Poems of Our Watery World. New York: Orchard Books.
More than 30 poems celebrate water in its myriad forms, from the ocean to a droplet of dew.

Graham, Joan Bransfield. 1994. Splish Splash: Poems. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
A collection of poems celebrating water in its various forms, from ice cubes to the ocean.

Lewis, Patrick J. 1991. Earth Verses and Water Rhymes. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers.
A collection of poems celebrating the natural world around us.

Wet Vacation

Taylor, Barbara. 2001. Weather and Climate: Geography Facts and Experiments. New York: Kingfisher Publications.
An introduction to weather and climate, discussing world climates, seasons, violent weather, weather pollution, and the elements of changing weather. Includes instructions for making a weather station.

Wet-Work Shuffle

Duvall, Jill. 1997. Who Keeps the Water Clean? Ms. Schindler! New York: Children’s Press.
Describes the activities of a sewage disposal plant worker who makes sure that the machines are functioning properly to keep the neighborhood’s water clean and safe.

Wetland Soils in Living Color

Stewart, Melissa. 2004. Down to Earth. Minneapolis, Minn.: Compass Point Books.
Introduces the components of soil, patterns of change, and erosion.

Tomecek, Steve. 2002. Dirt. Wash., D.C., National Geographic Society.
Brief text explores how soil is formed, its layers, and its importance as a natural resource that living things need to survive.

What’s Happening

Lewis, Barbara A. 1998. The Kid’s Guide to Social Action: How to Solve the Social Problems You Choose — And Turn Creative Thinking into Positive Action. Minneapolis, Minn.: Free Spirit Publications.
Resource guide for children for learning political action skills that can help them make a difference in solving social problems at the community, state, and national levels.

What’s the Solution

Watson, Philip. 1982. Liquid Magic. New York: Lothrop, Lee and Shepard Books.
Experiments illustrate the characteristics of liquids and their reactions in mixtures.

Ardley, Neil. 1991. The Science Book of Water. San Diego, Calif.: Hartcourt Brace Jovanovich.
Simple experiments demonstrate the properties of water.

Where Are the Frogs?

Morgan, Sally. 2006. Acid Rain. North Mankato, Minn.: Sea to Sea Publications.
Describes the causes of acid rain, its harmful effects, and efforts being made to solve this environmental problem.

Asimov, Isaac. 1992. What Causes Acid Rain? Milwaukee, Wis.: G. Stevens Children’s Books.
Discusses the nature and causes of acid rain, its harmful effects, and possible ways to prevent it.

Other resources

Sanders, Scott Russell. 1999. Crawdad creek. National Geographic Society. ISBN 0792270975. Grades K-4.
Based upon the author’s own childhood experiences, this book tells of two children who find fossils, frogs, crawdads, deer track, and many other treasures when they visit the creek behind their house.

Pratt-Serafini, Kristin Joy. 2000. Salamander Rain: A Lake and Pond Journal Dawn Publications. ISBN 1584690178. Grades K-4.
A boy named Klint joins the wetland patrol in which each member becomes and expert on a wetland habitat. This realistic, kid-friendly journal features paintings of lake and pond organisms, handwritten notes, clipped articles, and interesting facts about each creature. It provides a vibrant example that students can refer to when creating their own nature journals.

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