Water is a resource that we all use around our homes, many times without thinking about how much water we use. With limited fresh drinking water supplies, it is important that each of us take steps to save water and reduce unnecessary uses of water.

In this online survey, visit the areas around the screen that are marked with a yellow dot to read tips on how you can save water. Some of these areas provide a box in which you can enter information about your own daily water use.

After entering your water use, your total estimated daily water use for that section is automatically calculated, displayed and saved. Click/tap the box to return to the house. After you have visited all the areas in and around the home, click/tap “Report” for an estimated total of your daily water use.

Click/tap to proceed.

Click/tap here to learn
about other indoor
water uses

Click/tap here to learn
about other outdoor
water uses

Home water survey

Items to visit

Copyright
Shower Head

Some older shower use more than 5 gallons per minute (gpm). Newer showerheads following standards of Florida Building Code use 2.5 gpm. You could save even more water by installing WaterSense®–labeled models that use 2.0 gpm.

SHOWERS

Number of showers daily

Number of minutes

Gallons per minute

Total gallons used

x

x

2.0 (WaterSense®)

=

x

x

2.5 (Florida Building Code)

=

x

x

5 (Pre 1994)

=

Bath tub

A full tub typically holds 36 gallons. By filling the tub one–third full, you can save up to 24 gallons per bath.

Garden tubs use approximately 30 gallons more per bath than a regular tub.

BATHS

Number in family

Number of baths daily

Gallons per bath

Total gallons used

x

x

12 (1/3 tub)

=

x

x

36 (full tub)

=

x

x

70 (garden tub)

=

Bath tub

Consider replacing older model toilets with new, high-efficiency models. Older models use 3.5 gallons per flush. Also, save water in the bathroom by disposing of tissue, insects and other such wastes in a trash can rather than the toilet. In the chart below, use the Florida Building Code number if your house was built after Jan. 1, 1994, or use the WaterSense® number if you have recently retrofitted your fixtures. Otherwise, use the Pre 1994 number. The average number of flushes per person per day is four.

TOILET

Number in family

Flushes per day

Gallons per flush

Total gallons used

x

x

1.28 (WaterSense®)

=

x

x

1.6 (Florida Building Code)

=

x

x

3.5 (Pre 1994)

=

Bath tub

Most family members brush their teeth two times per day for an average of two minutes. Leaving the faucet on while brushing your teeth wastes water.

Retrofitting your faucet with a low–flow aerator will help save water in your home. Faucet aerators are circular screened disks that screw onto the faucet to reduce flow. Aerators are inexpensive and easy to install.

Check the flow number on the rim of the faucet aerator.

TOOTHBRUSHING

Number of brushes

Minutes per brush

Gallons per minute (gpm)

Total gallons used daily

x

x

1.5 (WaterSense®)

=

x

x

2.2 (Florida Building Code)

=

x

x

4 (Pre 1994)

=

Bath tub

The amount of water used for hand washing differs depending on where you wash your hands. Kitchen faucets typically have higher flow rates than bathroom faucets. For hand washing in the bathroom, enter your information next to the Florida Building Code number or WaterSense® lines as appropriate for a newer building and next to the Pre 1994 number for a home built prior to 1994.

HAND WASHING (BATHROOM)

Number of times

Minutes per time

Gallons per minute (gpm)

Total gallons used daily

x

x

1.5 (WaterSense®)

=

x

x

2.2 (Florida Building Code)

=

x

x

4 (Pre 1994)

=

Hand Dishwashing

Kitchen faucets have 2.2 gallons per minute flow rate. An aerator will lower your water use.

HAND DISHWASHING

Times washed per day

Minutes water runs

Gallons per minute (gpm)

Total gallons used

x

x

2.2 (Florida Building Code)

=

x

x

4 (Pre 1994)

=

Hand Dishwashing

The amount of water used for hand washing differs depending on where you wash your hands. Kitchen faucets typically have higher flow rates than bathroom faucets. For hand washing in the kitchen, enter your information next to the Florida Building Code number for a newer building and next to the Pre 1994 number for a home built prior to 1994.

HAND WASHING (KITCHEN)

Number of times

Minutes per time

Gallons per minute (gpm)

Total gallons used daily

x

x

2.2 (Florida Building Code)

=

x

x

4 (Pre 1994)

=

Dishwasher

A family that replaces an older dishwasher with a new, water-efficient model could save about 800 gallons of water per year. Newer models also are more energy efficient and will help you save utility costs. (Source: American Water Works Association).

DISHWASHER

Uses per week

Days per week

Gallons per load

Gallons used

÷

7

x

5.8 (ENERGY STAR©)

=

÷

7

x

6.5 (average)

=

÷

7

x

11 (high)

=

Laundry

A non-conserving washing machine uses an average of 30 gallons of water per load. To save water, consider replacing your older model with a high-efficient model that uses an average of 18 gallons per load. Engergy Star® models are high efficiency. For washing machines with variable settings for water volume, select the minimum amount required per load. If load size cannot be set, operate the washer with full loads only.

LAUNDRY

Loads per week

Days per week

Gallons per load

Total Gallons used

÷

7

x

18 (ENERGY STAR©)

=

÷

7

x

30 (average)

=

÷

7

x

40 (high)

=

Other Indoor uses

In the chart below, list other ways you use water indoors, such as in preparing food, etc. Then estimate the number of gallons you use for each activity.

Some additional tips to consider:

  • Repair leaks, drips and running toilets.
  • Do not use running water to thaw frozen food.
  • Never put water down the drain when there may be another use for it.

OTHER INDOOR USES

Use the box to fill in text.

Days per week

              
Other Indoor uses

In the chart below, list other ways you use water outdoors. You will need to estimate the number of gallons used.

Some additional tips to consider:

  • Position sprinklers to water the lawn not the street or driveway.
  • Use the appropriate sprinkler head for the type of area you want to water.
  • Plant drought-tolerant or Florida–friendly grasses, ground covers, shrubs and trees.

OTHER OUTDOOR USES

Use the box to fill in text.

Days per week

              
Automatic Irrigation Systems

The amount of rainfall your area receives should dictate how often you water your lawn and how much water you apply. A hearty rain eliminates the need for watering for as long as two weeks. Overwatering your lawn results in shallow roots, and promotes weed growth, disease and fungus. Water your lawn only when it shows signs of stress such as the lawn turning bluish-gray, leaf blades fold in half lengthwise or when footprints and tire tracks linger.

If supplemental irrigation is needed, it is allowed no more than two days a week during daylight saving time, no more than one day a week during Eastern Standard Time and only on designated days. Watering is only allowed before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m.

AUTOMATIC IRRIGATION SYSTEMS

Number of 45–degree sprinkler heads

Average run time per zone

Gallons per minute (gpm)*

Number of days watered each week

Gallons used weekly to irrigate

x

x

.5 gpm

x

=

Number of 90–degree sprinkler heads

x

x

.8 gpm

x

=

Number of 180–degree sprinkler heads

x

x

1.3 gpm

x

=

Number of 360–degree sprinkler heads

x

x

2.65 gpm

x

=

This chart provides an estimate.
For a more detailed/accurate figure, consider
asking your utility for an irrigation audit.

Total

=

* Assumes a 12–foot throw radius.

Hand Dishwashing

Wash your car efficiently. Consider using a commercial car wash that recycles water. If you wash your own car, park on the grass and use a hose with a spray nozzle. Efficiently washing your car with an automatic shut–off nozzle and spraying only as needed to rinse would use about 120 gallons (assuming a total rinse time of 10 minutes with a hose that delivers water at 12 gallons per minute [gpm]). By comparison, washing your car and leaving the hose running at a rate of 12 gpm during the roughly 45-minute process would use 540 gallons of water.

CAR WASHING

Number of uses per week

Average use time

Gallons per minute (gpm)

Gallons used per week

x

x

=

Watering with a hose

Outdoor faucets deliver an average of 8-12 gallons per minute (gpm).

At 12 gpm watering your lawn using a hose uses about 720 gallons per hour.

WATERING WITH A HOSE

Number of uses per week

Gallons per minute

Number of minutes

Number of days per week

Gallons used per week

x

12

x

x

=

Water conservation tip

Cut your grass at the highest recommended height for your turf species or the highest setting on your lawn mower. Cut no more than one-third of the grass length at one time to encourage grass roots to grow deeper.

Keep mower blades sharp for a clean cut. Dull blades tear grass, opening it to disease and increasing its need for water. Leave short grass clippings where they fall. The clippings reduce the lawn’s need for water and fertilizer. Remove thick patches of clippings so that the clippings will not kill the grass underneath.

Click/tap to return to the house.

Water conservation tip

Using mulch in your landscape helps retain soil moisture and moderates temperature. Mulching also helps to control weeds that compete with plants for water. Spread several inches of mulch, such as wood chips, pine straw or leaves, around shrubs, trees and flowerbeds.

Click/tap to return to the house.

Water conservation tip

Install only fountains that recycle. If you install an ornamental water feature, such as a fountain, make sure it is designed to recycle the water.

Click/tap to return to the house.

Water conservation tip

Collect water in a rain barrel to use to water your plants. Rainwater is free and is better for your plants because it doesn’t contain hard minerals. Planter beds, vegetable or flower gardens and potted plants can easily be irrigated with water from a rain barrel. Rain barrels are easy to construct following directions available from the Florida Yards and Neighborhoods Program.

Click/tap to return to the house.

Water conservation tip

Check all outdoor faucets and hoses for leaks. A small leak of 10 drops per minute can mean as much as 43 gallons lost each month. A faster leak of 120 drops per minute wastes 518 gallons each month.

Click/tap to return to the house.

Water conservation tip

Fertilize only as needed. When fertilizing, using the correct amount of fertilizer can save water and result in a healthier landscape. Overfertilizing will aggravate pest problems, stimulate excessive plant growth and demand frequent irrigation. Use fertilizers only when specific nutrient deficiencies are evident.

Apply fertilizers sparingly. Florida-friendly lawns require only moderate amounts of supplemental fertilizer once they are established. The amount of fertilizer to apply depends on a number of factors, such as grass species, soil type and permeability, and your location in the state. Follow the manufacturer’s directions on the bag, in terms of the amount per application. Know the exact square footage of lawn that a bag of fertilizer is intended to cover.

Click/tap to return to the house.

Water conservation tip

Make sure to set your automatic irrigation system time correctly. Set the time for before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., and set for no more than the maximum number of watering days for each time of year. Irrigation is allowed twice a week on designated days during daylight saving time and one day a week during Eastern Standard Time. The irrigation system should operate only long enough to apply no more than three-quarters of an inch of water; no more than one hour. Learn how to operate your system. Check timing devices regularly to make sure they are operating properly.

Click/tap to return to the house.

Water conservation tip

Be sure your automatic sprinkler system is equipped with a working rain shut–off device, which overrides the system when enough rain has fallen. Rain sensors are required by Florida law on all automatic sprinkler systems installed since 1991. To ensure proper functioning, the sensor should not be installed in an area that is blocked by roof overhangs, bushes or trees. Check regularly to make sure the device is working properly.

Click/tap to return to the house.

Water conservation tip

You can save water in your pool by installing a cover and ensuring you have no leaks. Placing a cover over your pool will help reduce the amount of water lost to evaporation while also increasing pool safety.

Click/tap to return to the house.

Indoor Uses

SHOWER

Number of showers daily

Number of minutes

Gallons per minute

Gallons used

x

x

2.0 (WaterSense®)

=

x

x

2.5 (Florida Building code)

=

x

x

5 (Pre 1994)

=

             
BATHS

Number of showers daily

Number of minutes

Gallons per minute

Gallons used

x

x

12 (1/3 tub)

=

x

x

36 (full tub)

=

x

x

70 (garden tub)

=

             
TOILET FLUSHING

Number in family

Flushes per day

Gallons per flush

Gallons used

x

x

1.28 (WaterSense®)

=

x

x

1.6 (Florida Building Code)

=

x

x

3.5 (Pre 1994)

=

             
TOOTHBRUSHING

Number of brushes

Minutes per brush

Gallons per minute

Gallons used

x

x

1.5 (WaterSense®)

=

x

x

2.2 (Florida Building Code)

=

x

x

4 (Pre 1994)

=

             
HAND WASHING (BATHROOM)

Number of times

Minutes per time

Gallons per minute

Gallons used

x

x

1.5 (WaterSense®)

=

x

x

2.2 (Florida Building Code)

=

x

x

4 (Pre 1994)

=

             
DISHWASHING BY HAND

Times washed

Minutes water runs

Gallons per minute

Gallons used

x

x

2.2 (Florida Building Code)

=

x

x

4 (Pre 1994)

=

             
HAND WASHING (KITCHEN)

Number of times

Minutes per time

Gallons per minute

Gallons used

x

x

2.2 (Florida Building Code)

=

x

x

4 (Pre 1994)

=

             
DISHWASHER

Uses per week

Days per week

Gallons per load

Gallons used

÷

7

x

5.8 (ENERGY STAR®)

=

÷

7

x

6.5 (average)

=

÷

7

x

11 (high)

=

             
LAUNDRY

Uses per week

Days per week

Gallons per load

Gallons used

÷

7

x

18 (ENERGY STAR®)

=

÷

7

x

30 (average)

=

÷

7

x

40 (high)

=

             
INDOOR USES REPORT

Description

Days per week

   

Outdoor Uses

CAR WASHING

Number of uses per week

Average use time

Gallons per minute

Gallons used

x

x

=

             
             
WATERING WITH A HOSE

Number of faucets

Gallons per minute

Number of minutes

Number of days per week

Gallons used per week

x

12

x

x

=

                 
                 
OUTDOOR USES REPORT

Description

Days per week

   
AUTOMATIC IRRIGATION SYSTEMS

Number of 45–degree sprinkler heads

Average run time per zone

Gallons per minute (gpm)*

Number of days watered each week

Gallons used weekly to irrigate

x

x

.5 gpm

=

=

Number of 90–degree sprinkler heads

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

x

x

.8 gpm

=

=

Number of180–degree sprinkler heads

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

x

x

1.3 gpm

=

=

Number of 360–degree sprinkler heads

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

x

x

2.65

=

=

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

=

Total daily indoor use: gallons
Total daily outdoor use: gallons
Total daily water usage: gallons

Definitions

Florida Building Code – The current (2011), statewide uniform building code that applies to all new construction, additions to existing buildings, manufactured homes and renovations that set minimum standards that must be met for plumbing, electrical, heating and cooling, etc.

WaterSense® – Products are labeled with a WaterSense® label if they meet water efficiency criteria as established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. WaterSense®is a partnership program to help consumers choose products that save water and protect the environment.

Pre 1994 – Significant updates were made to Florida Building Codes in 1994 to increase water and energy efficiency. Buildings constructed prior to 1994 that have existing fixtures are not as water or energy efficient as structures built to current building standards.

ENERGY STAR® – Labeling for products that are tested and rated as energy efficient by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy.

Thank you for taking this home water use survey. If you would like to learn other ways that you can save water, please visit floridaswater.com/waterconservation.